The Bishops

The Bishops

Sourcing The Fruit

At Liberty Ciderworks we source all of our fruit from local growers in the Pacific Northwest.  Two of our largest suppliers are the Bishops, featured at right, and Steury orchards.  Having great relationships with our growers allows us to control which apples are grown, when they are picked, and most importantly let's our customers know where their cider comes from.

Dabinett Dabinett is an English bittersweet apple that was found in the early 1900's in Somerset.  Dabinett brings wonderful tannins to cider and gives a real english feel to cider. This also can be an outstanding single varietal.  Bittersweet apples contain high tannins and low acid and are common in English cider.

Dabinett

Dabinett is an English bittersweet apple that was found in the early 1900's in Somerset.  Dabinett brings wonderful tannins to cider and gives a real english feel to cider. This also can be an outstanding single varietal. 

Bittersweet apples contain high tannins and low acid and are common in English cider.

Kingston Black Kinston Black is often thought of as the perfect single varietal apple.  It is a bittersharp apple and contains high levels of acid and tannins.  This apple is exceptionally balanced.  Kingston Black arose in the 19th century near Somerset in the town of Kinston.

Kingston Black

Kinston Black is often thought of as the perfect single varietal apple.  It is a bittersharp apple and contains high levels of acid and tannins.  This apple is exceptionally balanced. 

Kingston Black arose in the 19th century near Somerset in the town of Kinston.

Golden Russet Golden Russet apples are one of America’s greatest cider discoveries, found in New York in the early 1800s.  They have the potential for very high sugar content and yield multiple layers of flavors.  This apple is one of the few that makes an outstanding single varietal.

Golden Russet

Golden Russet apples are one of America’s greatest cider discoveries, found in New York in the early 1800s.  They have the potential for very high sugar content and yield multiple layers of flavors.  This apple is one of the few that makes an outstanding single varietal.

 
McIntosh McIntosh apples prove that great cider can be made from "dessert" apples.  Meaning they have little tanins and acids.  Try our Mcintosh and you'll experience the wonderful aromatics and flavors that are brought out of this apple by the wild yeast fermentation.

McIntosh

McIntosh apples prove that great cider can be made from "dessert" apples.  Meaning they have little tanins and acids. 

Try our Mcintosh and you'll experience the wonderful aromatics and flavors that are brought out of this apple by the wild yeast fermentation.

Yarlington Mill Yarlington Mill is an english bittersweet apple.  We think it brings an exceptional feel to the cider making it luxurious and smooth. It's said that the original yarlington mill apple was found growing out of a wall near a water mill in Yarlington North Cadbury in 1898.  Don't know if it's true but we're thankful it was found.

Yarlington Mill

Yarlington Mill is an english bittersweet apple.  We think it brings an exceptional feel to the cider making it luxurious and smooth.

It's said that the original yarlington mill apple was found growing out of a wall near a water mill in Yarlington North Cadbury in 1898.  Don't know if it's true but we're thankful it was found.

 Stoke Red If Kingston Black is the perfect cider apple the Stoke Red is it's brother.  While not as well known this apple makes a truly exceptional cider and is also quite outstanding when eaten fresh. Stoke Red originates from Rodney Stoke which is a village near Somerset England.

 Stoke Red

If Kingston Black is the perfect cider apple the Stoke Red is it's brother.  While not as well known this apple makes a truly exceptional cider and is also quite outstanding when eaten fresh.

Stoke Red originates from Rodney Stoke which is a village near Somerset England.

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